The Olympic Games is a tournament that started long time ago. In fact the first Olympics tournament was staged on the ancient plains of Olympia in Peloponnese, Greece. However, the festival was banned about 12 years later, only to reappear several hundred years later.  The first modern Olympics Games tournament was held in 1896 Athens Greece where 241 athletes participated, representing 14 nations.

Through the years, the festival gained popularity and today, the Olympics Games is a worldwide tournament. While this has been welcome news to everyone associated with the festival, the people tasked with organizing the events have for long been wondering if they could commercialize the festival. Of course they usually sell tickets for attending fans and get tons of money from sponsors. But beyond that, the Olympics Games has remained a sleeping giant.

It is with this in mind that the International Olympics Committee (IOC) initiated discussions with different parties on what they could do to commercialize the festival. The committee was sure that selling merchandise with the Olympic rings would definitely earn some money.

So, they called in two Canadian experts Ben Husle and Greg Durrell to help the committee curate and codify the designs of past Olympics games. After this process it would have been easier to decide what logos could be printed on what merchandise.

From the outlook, the job seemed simple. At most, all they had to do was gather all past records and assemble them somewhere. But having taken the job very seriously, the two partners might just have saved the world over a century worth of Olympic logos!

Apparently, the past logos were already “rotting” wherever they were stored. In some cases, part of the logos had been cut off in the process of scanned meaning that the records in the store were actually incorrect! But because no one ever cared to check, no one would have realized this. If not for the pair, maybe the world would have continued to assume that everything was okay when in actual sense, our Olympics records weren’t accurate.

After cross checking over 25,000 different items the two were able to help the IOC determine elements worth keeping in the Olympic logos. Thanks to their good work, it is now understood that there is a huge Olympic Heritage Collection in store. If you’re a Canadian retailer, maybe you should be visiting eMerchantBroker.com soon to get a Canadian merchant account in anticipation of what may be a grand sale!

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