The bail bonding process is something that is not always properly understood by many people, because it can be somewhat complicated and confusing. While it may seem like a difficult to understand concept at first, at its core bail bonds are actually a remarkably simple thing. The basis of bail bonding is surety bonds. A bail bond surety is a type of bond agreement between the person who is getting out of jail (or in some cases their representative) and the bail bond agent.

The surety bond is basically a promise that centers on a financial agreement. The person who is posting the bail bond money (typically around 10 percent of the amount of the stated bail, but it does vary) will pay that money to the bail bond agent in order to secure the release from jail. The person posting the money will also be signing a bail bond contract which is part of the surety bond. This contract states that the person being released from jail must appear in court when required. If they do not, the person signing the contract is legally obligated to remit the entire amount of bail to the bail bond agent. Generally, this would mean that the remaining 90 percent of the bail would have to be paid if the person who was released from jail didn’t show up for their court dates.

A surety bail bond is a great way to save money if you happen to be short on money when a disaster strikes and someone you love gets arrested. The concept of a surety bond is essentially one that protects people from the often exorbitant price of bonds. Many people simply can’t come up with thousands of dollars at the drop of a hat, and that is where the surety bond is there to bridge that gap.

The risk with a surety bond is often a very low one. Generally, the only people who will be eligible to sign a surety bond to bail someone out of jail are those people who are either in jail, or people who are close friends or relatives of the person in jail. Therefore, it is easy to feel confident that the arrested person will appear for court and meet the terms of their surety bond.

Comments are closed.

Post Navigation